Animal Rights Collective Blog


Circus demo/vigil schedules – spring 2014 by 1gabriela
Unfortunately, every spring semester at George Mason University signals the arrival of the Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus. ARC – along with community members – have protested Ringling’s animal cruelty for several years and are ready to do so once again.

To read more about ARC’s anti-Ringling efforts in the past (including our past petitions, support from Student Senate & the passing of Resolution 23, as well as Mason media coverage of the demos/vigils), click here. For more information about animal abuse in circuses, particularly Ringling, please check out RinglingBeatsAnimals.com.

Contrary to popular belief, animal circuses do not provide any sort of cultural enrichment nor notion of environmental conservation; and instead, promote poaching, exploitation (both human and nonhuman), captivity, and cruel practices. Please consider lending your voice to animals.

We welcome anyone and everyone to the demos and even provide signs and materials for each demo/vigil. Please disseminate this page as well!

Below are the list of demos and vigils beginning this Wednesday, April 9th.

Meet at  Patriot Center, Fairfax VA (GMU campus), at the Will-Call area on Po River Ln, close to the intersection with Roanoke River Ln (where we always are for protests)
 

Wednesday, April 9 (opening night in FFX): Vigil at 9:00 pm

Friday, April 11: Vigil at 9:30p

Saturday, April 12: 5:30p – 8:00p (vigil for the end of one show and leaflet for the beginning of the next)

Sunday, April 13: 3:00p – 5:30p   (vigil for the end of one show and leaflet for the beginning of the next)

Thursday, April 17: 9:00p Vigil

Friday, April 18: 9:30p Vigil

Saturday, April 19: 5:30p – 8:00p   (vigil for the end of one show and leaflet for the beginning of the next)

Sunday, April 20 (Final show for them in our area): 3:00p – 5:30p  (vigil for the end of one show and leaflet for the beginning of the next)

To further emphasize the importance of these efforts, here some photos taken by ARC precisely ON CAMPUS in the last two years.

"Handler" pulls down the elephant's head with a bullhook, which resembles a fire-poker and are quite painful (Spring 2012)

“Handler” pulls down the elephant’s head with a bullhook, which resembles a fire-poker and are quite painful (Spring 2012)

"Handler" with a closer look at the billhook (Spring 2012)

“Handler” with a closer look at the billhook (Spring 2012)

Performers struggle with one of the dogs (Spring 2013)

Performers struggle with one of the dogs (Spring 2013)

Unhealthy conditions of the llamas; just look at their (lack of) fur! (Spring 2013)

Unhealthy conditions of the llamas; just look at their (lack of) fur! (Spring 2013)

"Handler" using the bullhook on elephant (Spring 2013)

“Handler” using the bullhook on elephant (Spring 2013)



Volunteer Day & Tour @ Poplar Spring Animal Sanctuary by christine

Join us and Compassion for Animals as we volunteer to help care for the rescued animals at Poplar Spring Animal Sanctuary.

VOLUNTEER…ENJOY A PICNIC LUNCH…MEET THE ANIMALS…

or all of the above!

Sunday August 28, 2011

Compassion for Animals is organizing a combination “volunteer day” and guided tour at Poplar Spring Animal Sanctuary. Please sign up for either event or both by RSVPing to info@compassion4animals.org.

Volunteering starts at 9am, and the tour starts at 1pm; there will be a lunch break in the middle. The tour can accommodate up to 40 people—bring your friends! Details below.

We’re especially interested in attracting people who have never been to this wonderful, peaceful place—but anyone can sign up!

Poplar Spring is a 400-acre oasis near Poolesville, Maryland, about 45 minutes from DC. The residents of Poplar Spring are 200 “farm animals” rescued from abuse, neglect, abandonment, and cruelty. Their stories are often heartbreaking, but their resilience and recovery—and the compassion they’ve received from caring humans—is inspiring.

Come meet the chickens, turkeys, cows, pigs, goats, sheep, rabbits, and other animals who live freely at Poplar Spring. You may be amazed at some of their personalities.

Volunteers:

There are lots of chores to be done at the sanctuary, and on the weekends they’re done by volunteers. We’ll spread hay, clean barns, refill water bowls, brush horses, and—yes—shovel poop. It usually takes about three hours to get all the tasks done.

Volunteers may want to bring an extra pair of shoes and socks, and maybe an extra shirt, as well as a pair of work or gardening gloves. You may also want to bring some water, although you can buy bottled water at the sanctuary.

Although we’ve helped out at Poplar Spring for years and have never seen any accidents, and you’ll be led by experienced, safety-conscious sanctuary directors and volunteers, the sanctuary does ask that first-time volunteers fill out this volunteer application form AND waiver form (both are necessary); you can either mail them back to Poplar Spring or bring them with you when you show up. The work is not particularly strenuous; it is more like house-cleaning than aerobics. Volunteers on any given day may range from teenagers to those drawing Social Security; you can participate at your own pace. The environment at Poplar Spring is very friendly and supportive. Volunteers under 16 years old must be accompanied by an adult.

You’ll likely get a chance to rub a pig’s belly, hold a chicken, and pet turkeys, goats, and other animals. Very cool stuff. But please do so under supervision, as the long-time volunteers and sanctuary directors will have useful tips and will know which animals like (or do not like) that sort of interaction. If you’ll also be taking the tour, there will also be opportunities to interact with the animals then.

Note: We have to limit the number of volunteers for sanctuary chores to about 10, so it’s important that you RSVP.

Lunch:

People volunteering or taking the tour are invited to bring a vegan (no animal ingredients) picnic lunch. We’ll eat lunch from the time we finish the morning chores until 1 pm. Compassion for Animals will bring some vegan food to share, including desserts. There are picnic tables, as well as wash-up facilities and a place to buy water and iced tea on the grounds. So here’s the schedule:

9 AM-noon — Sanctuary Cleanup

Noon-1 PM — Lunch

1-2PM — Guided Tour

.

Poplar Spring Animal Sanctuary

15200 Mt. Nebo Rd.

Poolesville, Maryland 20837

[map and directions]

When you arrive, open the gate to drive in, then close the gate behind you. Drive about a mile along the gravel road until you get near the end and can see some of the buildings on the property. We’ll gather there. You can park your vehicle on the grass by the side of the road.

We can probably arrange some carpooling. Let us know if that’s something you’d be interested in.

RSVP: info@compassion4animals.org

We hope to see you there! 




NASA to Radiate Squirrel Monkeys by christine

NASA will be exposing 18 to 28 squirrel monkeys to low doses of radiation to understand the effects of long distance space travel.

With NASA’s conference in DC this week, we have to mention…

NASA’s Plan to Radiate Squirrel Monkeys

For the first time in decades NASA is stepping up its space radiation program to use monkeys as the subjects of its studies.  NASA will expose 18 to 28 Squirrel monkeys to radiation and periodically test them to gauge how exposure affects performance in a variety of learned tasks. This research will violate NASA’s own stated principles regarding animal ethics. According to the Physician’s Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), “that policy, established in 1996, asserts that ‘the minimization of distress, pain and suffering is a moral imperative’ and emphasizes that experimenters must weigh the burdens of animal subjects against potential societal benefits.”

from PETA

NASA has recently announced a shocking plan to spend $1.75 million of taxpayer money to fund an experiment in which up to 30 squirrel monkeys will be blasted with a massive dose of radiation equivalent to what a human would experience during three years in outer space. These monkeys will then live the rest of their lives in cages and be forced to endure years of behavioral tests to measure the inevitable devastation that the radiation causes to their brains and bodies, which would likely include brain damage, skin inflammation, blindness, various types of cancer, including brain tumors, and premature death.

Like all animal experiments, physiological and anatomical differences between species make it impossible to generate data that can be reliably applied to humans. And the large single dose of radiation that the monkeys will be exposed to in a matter of minutes is nothing like the low levels of radiation that human astronauts would be exposed to over extended periods of time in space. The only guarantee that comes with these experiments is that sensitive and intelligent monkeys will be caused immeasurable harm.

from Animal-rights activists vs. NASA over plan to radiate monkeys

Science Takes a Giant Leap Backward

Kathleen Conlee, director of program management for animal research at the Humane Society, worked with monkeys used in radiation experiments. She said the effects on the animals were devastating.

“Their teeth fell out. They self-mutilated,” she said.

Conlee said NASA is disregarding its own guidelines. Humane Society Executive Vice President Andrew Rowan “chaired a committee that was convened by NASA itself,” Conlee said. “And they came out with a report on animal use. This use goes against many of the principles in that report.”

Ineffective

PETA believes the experiment is not just harmful but useless.

The monkeys will receive vastly different quantities of radiation than humans would receive while traveling through space, Justin Goodman, a research supervisor at PETA and a protester said.

“The current experiment that’s being planned is going to expose monkeys to one massive dose of radiation,” Goodman said.

“When humans go into space, they’re going to be exposed to a low level of radiation.”

Conlee said other primates often don’t react as humans do.

“Just because you’re using a primate doesn’t mean that you’re going to get the results a human would,” Conlee said.

Conlee said that similar experiments have already been conducted on many animals, including primates.

“There have been literally hundreds of government-funded radiation experiments since the ’50s,” she said. “This data is already out there.”

Waste of money

The experiment is costly, and since NASA is a government agency, the money will come from taxpayers.

“NASA’s about to squander $2 million of public tax money on these experiments,” Goodman said.

Sign the Petitions!

Ask Administrator Bolden to Stop the Use of Monkeys in Space Radiation Studies

Tell Congress to stop NASA’s Cruel Monkey Experiments

Doctors File Federal Petition to Stop NASA’s Monkey Radiation Experiments

Use of Squirrel Monkeys Called Giant Leap Backward for Space Agency

PCRM Press Release

WASHINGTON—A nonprofit physicians organization is confronting NASA over the space agency’s plan to expose squirrel monkeys to radiation in an attempt to understand the effects of interplanetary travel. In a federal petition for administrative action filed Nov. 5, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) seeks to compel the government to halt the monkey experiments because they violate the NASA Principles for the Ethical Care and Use of Animals, also known as the Sundowner Report. The space agency has not used monkeys for radiobiology research in decades.

“Irradiating monkeys would be one giant leap backward for NASA,” says Hope Ferdowsian, M.D., M.P.H., PCRM’s director of research policy. “The proposed experiments are cruel, unnecessary, and lack scientific merit. There are better, more humane ways of understanding the potential dangers of interplanetary travel to humans. Scientific progress can only proceed with a strong ethical foundation.”

The experiments—proposed by researcher Jack Bergman of McLean Hospital in Boston—would involve irradiating monkeys and testing them to see how they perform on various tasks. Bergman has used squirrel monkeys for 15 years in addiction experiments, which have involved applying electric shocks, withholding food, and completely immobilizing the animals in restraint chairs for extended periods.

Radiation experiments involving nonhuman primates commonly involve restraint and other inhumane procedures. PCRM’s petition for administrative action points out that Bergman’s radiation experiments will violate the standards of the Sundowner Report, a landmark 1996 NASA document that requires researchers to respect living creatures and to consider the full range of societal good that may come from an experiment. Additionally, nonanimal methods should be used whenever possible.

PCRM’s petition for administrative action states, “Genetic, physiological, and anatomical differences between humans and monkeys dramatically limit the conclusions that can be drawn from the planned experiments. Ongoing studies, including those funded by NASA and the U.S. Department of Energy, already use nonanimal methods to determine the effects of low-dose radiation on human tissues.”

The petition continues: “Interplanetary human travel is, at best, a highly speculative aim for the foreseeable future. It is obviously fraught with many dangers and enormous expense, while serving goals that are not at all clear. To put animals through radiation tests now in anticipation of such an enterprise is in no way justified.”

Founded in 1985, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine is a nonprofit organization that promotes preventive medicine, conducts clinical research, and encourages higher standards for ethics and effectiveness in research.

In The News:

Animal-rights activists vs. NASA over plan to radiate monkeys

NASA-funded monkey-radiation experiment raises hackles



World Vegan Day! by christine
November 1, 2009, 12:00 pm
Filed under: Announcement, News, Vegan | Tags:

Today celebrates the 65th anniversary of the founding of The Vegan Society. Go vegan today and start living more compassionately! For the animals, for your health, and for the environment! Start saving the world…

Why Vegan? 

Free Vegan Starter Guide, PDF (which includes recipes).

Do they live this way for YOU?

Do it for her…

…or them…

Veal Crates

…or them!

Learn more about the founding of veganism and World Vegan Day! 

they have families too!



Happy Halloween! by christine
October 31, 2009, 3:27 am
Filed under: Announcement | Tags:

Have a Happy Halloween! Get ready…tomorrow is World Vegan Day!

Flesh is for Zombies!

*Remember to keep your kitties inside today, so no human goblins snatch them! 😦

Eat Vegan Candy.




World Go Vegan Week by christine

October 25th through 31st is World Go Vegan Week! Declared by In Defense of Animals (IDA) this week leads up to World Vegan Day on November 1st. 

Everyone should use this week to try being cruelty-free and debunk some of the myths about a vegan diet for themselves. If you’ve been flirting with the idea of going vegan, what better time than now? We have plenty of resources on our blog to help you transition to a vegan diet, including vegan menu plans and recipes. There is also a list of restaurants with vegan options in VA/DC/MD available at VegDC.com. If you have any questions about veganism, please don’t hesitate to ask.

Week Menu of Vegan Recipes. Or our “Vegan Eatin’ on a Budget” page includes a list of cheap vegan menu options by COK.

Visit our “Why Vegan” page and Why Vegan? for more information. Watch Earthlings if you need to see more. 

ARC will be having a Halloween Vegan Bake Sale on October 27th to celebrate, with proceeds going to Farm Sanctuary, which advocates for and rescues farm animals that would otherwise be slaughtered. We will have cupcakes, brownies, cookies, Dr. Verardo’s famous scones, banana bread, vegan rice crispy treats – and more! Yum! 11 to 4pm, Johnson Center Plaza – George Mason University, Fairfax.



Primate Liberation Week: October 17-24, 2009 by christine

Even George Mason University endorses and will soon be conducting (if they don’t already) experiments on primates. A Biomedical Research Laboratory is being finished at the Prince William Campus, which will test on primates, rabbits and rodents, and then toss their mutilated bodies into a chemical digester. This doesn’t include the archaic and perverted animal tests that already occur on our campus. For example, the psychology department at GMU conducts testing on rodents, shocking them in order to induce fear in what is called a “fear conditioning chamber.”

That makes George Mason University President Alan G. Merten complicit in animal cruelty, tell him you do not approve.

President Alan G. Merten, Office of the President

D103 Mason Hall, Ffx, MSN: 3A1

Phone: (703) 993-8700 | Fax: (703) 993-8880

amerten@gmu.edu

Primate Experimentation in the United States: 

A National Picture

from Stop Animal Exploitation Now! (SAEN)

The Facts About Animal Experiments

Primate experimentation in the U.S. is out of control. All-time high 69,990 primates are imprisoned in US labs for experimentation – a five year increase of 31%. An equal amount are held captive for breeding, making the total closer to 120,000. We estimate that funding for primate experimentation has also increased reaching $1.6 billion during fiscal 2007. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is responsible for most of this waste. Experimentation on primates is funded by several federal agencies including NIH, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Defense.

restraint chair

Widespread Suffering

Many different species of primates including macaque monkeys, squirrel monkeys, baboons, and chimpanzees are experimented on in many different ways. Macaque monkeys are used most often, with baboons second and squirrel monkeys third.
Isolation is severely stressful to primates. In fact, 10% of isolated primates are so severely stressed that they begin to engage in self-injurious behavior. Many different psychological experiments also stress primates severely. Many primates suffer terribly inside labs across the U.S.

Harvard – 2100 primates imprisoned; 55% infant mortality rate; over 300 primates in solitary confinement; many exhibiting signs of pathological behavior.

University of California, Davis – 7700 primates confined, records for 400 monkeys revealed 403 traumatic injuries, 143 amputations, along with 387 wounds, 221 bites, 70 abrasions, 171 lacerations, and 40 fractures. Experiments confine primates to restraint chairs and use water deprivation.

Wake Forest – imprisons over 1000 primates; monkeys are socially isolated, deprived of sleep and subjected to addiction drugs.

University of Wisconsin Madison — (UW) imprisons approximately 1500 primates. Primates escape from cages severely injuring other animals. Other monkeys suffer with brain abscesses due to the bolting of devices into the bones of the skull.

Brain Implant

University of California, San Francisco – Over 100 primates incarcerated; government documents reveal primates deprived of water for as much as 22 hours per day. Monkeys lose over 15% of their body weight and self mutilate in neurological experiments.

Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research – imprisons over 5700 primates; recently cited for beginning post-mortem dissection of a baboon that was not yet dead.

University of Washington, Seattle – Over 2200 primate imprisoned. Recently cited for performing unapproved surgical procedures – one researcher entirely removed the head of a primate.

Johns Hopkins University – confines over 800 primates; monkeys are used in drug addiction experiments and brain mapping projects which force electrodes directly into the brain of conscious animals.

University of Minnesota – imprisons over 180 primates; drug addiction experiments during which primates are so stressed that they rip out their own hair while screaming; other monkeys are deprived of water and socially isolated.

primate-vivi9

Many diseases and conditions plague the primates that are held captive within laboratories, such as: meningitis, pneumonia, encephalitis, hepatitis, and gastric bloat. Monkeys often lose fingers, toes, and tails through amputation.



Common experimental practices include depriving primates of food or water so that these things become effective rewards. In some instances, the primates may receive water for only an hour or two per day, or are deprived of as much as 20% of their regular food intake.



The use of primate restraint chairs is also common, with confinement reaching as much as 104 consecutive hours. These devices are highly stressful for normally active and mobile primates. In brain mapping experiments many devices are literally bolted onto the skulls of primates, and electrodes are fed directly into the brain. Intravenous catheters are surgically implanted in experiments with addictive drugs. These devices can lead to serious infections, and other potentially fatal conditions.

Government Waste

Most primates are not used in experiments that study the diseases that kill most Americans. Projects that study primate psychology, alcohol & addictive drugs, brain-mapping, and sex in primates far outnumber studies involving heart disease or cancer. Repetition is rampant among NIH-funded projects. Currently, the National Eye Institute funds 57 projects that use primates in brain-mapping. These duplicative experiments waste over $110 million every five years. Many of these projects continue on for decades wasting millions of tax dollars each year and victimizing primates for an entire lifetime.

Remember one thing: the primates who are suffering in laboratories as you read this letter are depending on us to work together to fight for their freedom. We must exercise our rights (free speech, freedom of assembly, etc.) so that we can fight for the recognition of their rights. They have no voice but ours. They have no protection, no hope, unless you act. For every activist that does nothing, more primates suffer and die.

To learn more about primate experimentation in the US, visit SAEN.

Video: Cruelty at Covance Labs in Vienna, VA

Sign the Covance Petition

cling

Did you know Tylenol kills cats and dogs? Or that Penicillin kills guinea pigs? Learn why animal testing is antiquated and about alternatives to animal testing.

Learn more about primates in laboratories

Speak Out for Chimps

Unseen they suffer,

Unheard they cry,

In agony they linger,

In loneliness they die.

monkey

Your Liberation is Bound Up in Mine

Liberation

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

– Martin Luther King, Jr. 

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